18-month-old toddler’s rash hid devastating diagnosis


When mum of four Kirsty O’Brien noticed a rash on her youngest child she was told not to worry. But just days later there was devastating news.

Before she noticed a rash on the body of her 18-month-old daughter, Kirsty O’Brien said she “didn’t even realise” that kids could get cancer.

“I’d had four children – Ava was my youngest – and they were all so healthy. We were never even at the doctors,” Ms O’Brien told news.com.au.

“And the bubble I was living in, I didn’t even realise that kids got cancer. That was something I thought happened to people who were older and didn’t look after themselves. I just could not fathom how it could happen to a child who had been healthy up until that point – especially with no precursor of them even being unwell. It was just something I couldn’t believe.”

At first, she was told the rash was “something viral and not to worry” – but two days later, when Ava woke up from her nap, Ms O’Brien said she was “just deathly pale white and sweating, with these two golf ball-sized lumps on her neck, underneath her ears on either side”.

“I took her straight up to my local medical centre and they thought it was mumps, and I said, ‘Nope, no way, please take a blood test’. They did, and by the time I’d driven home – which is about 10 minutes – they called and said, ‘Come straight back, pack a bag’.”

It was then that Ms O’Brien was told her daughter had acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

Ava was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia when she was just 18 months old. Picture: Supplied

Ava was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia when she was just 18 months old. Picture: SuppliedSource:Supplied

Her mum Kirsty said before her daughter’s diagnosis she “didn’t even realise that kids got cancer”. Picture: Supplied

Her mum Kirsty said before her daughter’s diagnosis she “didn’t even realise that kids got cancer”. Picture: SuppliedSource:Supplied

The family were assigned a team of doctors at Randwick Children’s Hospital, a port was placed underneath Ava’s skin, and she began chemotherapy a day later.

“Ava did everything that you were meant to do, she went into remission after the first month, she had nine months of what they call intense treatment and then at the end of that, she did 18 months of oral chemo at home,” she said.

On the eve of a regular check-up – seven months after Ava, then four, stopped treatment – Ms O’Brien was getting her out of the bath when she noticed “that same rash, just a really small tiny one, on her hip”.

“And I showed my husband and he was like, ‘Don’t worry about it, it’s nothing, you know you’re going for a check-up tomorrow’, because I was always looking for something to go wrong,” she said.

“And then we went the next day and you have your bloods in the morning, and then they see you in the afternoon and look at the bloods and they just kept us waiting for so long. And finally they called us in and they said, ‘There’s a problem with the bloods and it can only mean one thing: that she’s relapsed’. And I just could not believe it.”

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When Ava relapsed at the age of four, Ms O’Brien said it was a “whole different ball game”. Picture: Supplied

When Ava relapsed at the age of four, Ms O’Brien said it was a “whole different ball game”. Picture: SuppliedSource:Supplied

Following her initial diagnosis, Ava’s treatment had been “textbook”. But from the minute they were told she’d relapsed, Ms O’Brien said “our whole life just changed”.

“It was horrible. It was the worst thing I’ve ever been through, and I know that she’s ever been through,” she said.

“The chemo that they started her on was so intense that she didn’t walk, talk, smile, laugh – some days she wouldn’t even look at me. She just was so sick and just not herself, and she was like that for 35 days.”

When, on December 1, Ava became allergic to one of the drugs, developed pancreatitis and was admitted to the ICU, Ms O’Brien said it marked a “turning point” for their family, having realised “how serious this was going to be” as they waited on a bone-marrow transplant donor for Ava.

Not long after, they were told a matched unknown donor from overseas had been found, and “here we are, six years post transplant now”.

“The transplant itself is non-invasive – so a little bit of a let-down in terms of thinking, ‘Oh, is that it?’ – but it’s the treatment that leads up to it. And then, you just wait and slowly, each day after day, you see her bloods change and you can see her starting to get her health back, and her body starting to work normally,” Ms O’Brien said.

“It was just such a miraculous thing where you see the body learn how to work for itself again.”

(Source)


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