Malka Leifer has returned to Australia to face child sex abuse charges. Here's what will happen next


More than a decade after leaving Melbourne for Israel, former school principal Malka Leifer has arrived back in Australia to face child sexual abuse charges.

Attorney-General Christian Porter said she would face trial in Victoria on 74 counts of child sexual abuse.

Former Victorian premier Ted Baillieu, who has been an advocate for Ms Leifer's alleged victims during the protracted extradition process, stressed the latest step was "just the beginning".

Ms Leifer has maintained her innocence throughout six years of court proceedings in Israel.

"These allegations are still to be tested," Mr Baillieu told ABC Radio Melbourne on Tuesday.

This is what we know about what will happen next.

Ms Leifer will undergo a 14-day quarantine

The Victorian Government confirmed Ms Leifer will be held in "Victoria Police quarantine" until she is brought before the courts.

All prisoners in Victoria must serve a 14-day quarantine and are regularly tested for coronavirus.

Ms Leifer arrived at Melbourne's Tullamarine Airport on Wednesday evening with a Victoria Police escort.

Mr Baillieu reflected that those officers, who he said would also be undergoing 14 days' quarantine, had made "some pretty enormous sacrifices" to ensure the legal process could take place.

Ms Leifer's lawyer in Israel, Nick Kaufman, said he was hopeful she would be held in a place of detention that respected her religious beliefs and allowed regular contact with her lawyers and family.

But after that, extraditions are usually followed by a standard court process

The Attorney-General said the "extremely serious charges" would now be tested by Victorian courts.

More than a decade after leaving Melbourne for Israel, former school principal Malka Leifer has arrived back in Australia to face child sexual abuse charges.

Attorney-General Christian Porter said she would face trial in Victoria on 74 counts of child sexual abuse.

Former Victorian premier Ted Baillieu, who has been an advocate for Ms Leifer's alleged victims during the protracted extradition process, stressed the latest step was "just the beginning".

Ms Leifer has maintained her innocence throughout six years of court proceedings in Israel.

"These allegations are still to be tested," Mr Baillieu told ABC Radio Melbourne on Tuesday.

This is what we know about what will happen next.

Ms Leifer will undergo a 14-day quarantine

The Victorian Government confirmed Ms Leifer will be held in "Victoria Police quarantine" until she is brought before the courts.

All prisoners in Victoria must serve a 14-day quarantine and are regularly tested for coronavirus.

Ms Leifer arrived at Melbourne's Tullamarine Airport on Wednesday evening with a Victoria Police escort.

Mr Baillieu reflected that those officers, who he said would also be undergoing 14 days' quarantine, had made "some pretty enormous sacrifices" to ensure the legal process could take place.

Ms Leifer's lawyer in Israel, Nick Kaufman, said he was hopeful she would be held in a place of detention that respected her religious beliefs and allowed regular contact with her lawyers and family.

But after that, extraditions are usually followed by a standard court process

The Attorney-General said the "extremely serious charges" would now be tested by Victorian courts.

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